With Steam Link App, Your Smartphone Can Be An Imperfect Gaming Monitor

Ars Technica’s Kyle Orland shares his experience with Valve’s recently announced Steam Link app, which lets users play games running on a PC via a tablet, mobile phone, or Apple TV on the same network. The app launches today for Android 5.0+ devices; iOS support is “pending further review from Apple.” From the report: Valve isn’t kidding when it says a Wi-Fi router in the 5Ghz band is required for wireless streaming. I first tested iPad streaming on the low-end 2.4Ghz router provided with my Verizon FiOS subscription (an Actiontec MI424WR), with a wired Ethernet connection to my Windows gaming rig on the other end. The Steam Link network test warned me that “your network may not work well with Steam Link,” thanks to 1- to 2-percent frame loss and about 15ms of “network variance,” depending on when I tested. Even graphically simple games like The Binding of Isaac ran at an unplayably slowed-down rate on this connection, with frequent dropped inputs to boot.

Switching over to a 5GHz tri-band router (The Netgear Nighthawk X6, to be precise), the same network test reported a “fantastic” connection that “look[s] like it will work well with Steam.” On this router, remotely played games ran incredibly smoothly at the iPad’s full 1080p resolution, with total round-trip display latency ranging anywhere from 50 to 150ms, according to Steam Link’s reports (and one-way “input lag” of less than 1ms). At that level of delay, playing felt practically indistinguishable from playing directly on the computer, with no noticeable gameplay impact even on quick-response titles like Cuphead.

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