Adobe is Reviving the Stunning Lost Fonts of the Bauhaus

An anonymous reader shares a report: Even if you’re not a designer, you’ve probably heard the phrase “form follows function.” That’s how influential the school that espoused it, the Bauhaus, has become since its heyday in 1920s and ’30s Germany. Now, some of the movement’s most compelling — but largely unknown — lettering has been recreated from archival material, like original typography sketches and letter fragments, and transformed into contemporary digital typefaces. The project is part of an Adobe initiative called Hidden Treasures that resurfaces design gems from the past in Adobe products — previously, the company recreated the paintbrushes used by painter Edvard Munch for use in Photoshop. For the second iteration of the initiative, Adobe worked with the Bauhaus archives in Berlin, Germany, to bring in five design students to create five distinct typefaces, all under the guidance of expert typeface designer Erik Spiekermann. While each of the typefaces will eventually be available to all users of Adobe Typekit, two are now available online: one inspired by Joost Schmidt, a teacher at the Bauhaus who also created the famed poster for the 1923 Bauhaus Exhibition, and the other inspired by Xanti Schawinsky, who taught classes in set design at the school.

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